Recent comments

Goodbye, my Son. My friend.
Kenneth Clarkson (not verified)
6 weeks 1 day ago

It was so heart melting words being shared through the post. but unfortunately it is the reality of the life that one day everyone has to leave this planet. rest in peace Aaron.

Goodbye, my Son. My friend.
Nathan Gasser (not verified)
6 weeks 1 day ago

I met Aaron a few times at Drupal events. For those not familiar with his contributions, on some significant percentage of Drupal sites, when you insert an image or a YouTube video onto your page, you're benefitting from Aaron's work. I never got to know him as a friend, but respected him professionally, and was impressed by the grace with which he faced his struggle. Be well, Aaron.

Goodbye, my Son. My friend.
Mike Nescot (not verified)
7 weeks 4 days ago

I met and saw Aaron make a presentation at Drupal NYCCamp 2013 and I was was immensely touched by his passion, intelligence, and determination to learn, build, and contribute all he could to the Drupal community and everyone else in the time he was given. He succeeded in all!

Goodbye, my Son. My friend.
Mike Nescot (not verified)
7 weeks 4 days ago

I met and saw Aaron make a presentation at Drupal NYCCamp 2013 and I was was immensely touched by his passion, intelligence, and determination to learn, build, and contribute all he could to the Drupal community and everyone else in the time he was given. He succeeded in all!

Goodbye, my Son. My friend.
Lynn Winborn (not verified)
8 weeks 14 hours ago

From the time Aaron was born, it became evident that he would be a communicator, an explorer, and a lover of life. He was a Gemini, like me. His birth name was actually Jeffrey Aaron Winborn, which spelled JAW, and true to his initials, and the word it spelled, he loved to talk...about anything and everything he could think of. He had a mind of his own, too, and a way of getting away with things. When he was a toddler, we had a stereo with 8-track tape player, and I used to slap his hands, just little taps and tell him No, no! when he would go toward it. Well, one day, after I had told him a few times to leave it alone, he started walking toward it, turned around with a grin on his face, slapped his hand and said, No, no...and kept on going! Speaking of going places, the little explorer got away once when he was three...took off for a walk, when I had just checked on him a few minutes before. He came home in a police car, and the officer said he had found him down the block, and it was a good thing he had known his name and where he lived. I knew then he would have an adventurous life. And he did, so independent, that when he got old enough after graduation from high school, he just took off and told us after the fact about his adventures.
He was a fast learner, and loved learning. When he was four, I was reading him a bedtime story from one of those big books with hundreds of pages, and he was watching intently, and then started calling out the page numbers, up into the hundreds, and he hadn't been taught to count that high. His love of numbers eventually led to a love and a fascination with computers. He was born to work with computers. Even as a child in elementary school, he talked about computers, made a cardboard replica of a computer and said someday people would have them in their homes. How prophetic that was. And we did have a few computers as time went by, Vic20, Commodore 64, and TRS 80. As has been seen over the years, he did very well with them, as a programmer, and website designer, and working with Drupal in open source software development.
Aaron changed his name a few times over his life, before settling on Aaron: Jeff, Jeffrey John, J. Aaron, and then finally Aaron. His reasoning for settling on Aaron, which is what he was called from the time he was born anyway, was that if he became a famous writer, his books would be among the first on a shelf in a library. He did have a bit of an ego...along with a wry sense of humor.
I could sit here all night, telling stories about Aaron, so many stories, so many facets to this shining gem. He was a bright Light to the world in so many ways, impacted so many lives, many friends all over the world. But now that Light has left earth and gone to take its place as one of the brightest stars in the sky. And I have to, finally, tell my son goodbye.

I Don't Know How To Say Goodbye

I don't know how to say goodbye,
But angel wings are meant to fly,
And avatars don't really die,
And yet, the mother poet cries.

The mother, now the wiser crone,
Knows her son is not alone,
In meditation's silent dream,
Vision flashes in a stream,
Ancestors stood beside his bed,
And Homeward bound, his soul, they led.

For 5 long years, he fought disease,
ALS caused much unease,
Pain sometimes made tears fall like rain,
But his smile came through again.

He loved people, loved his life,
Loved his children, loved his wife,
Loved adventure, and having fun,
And now, as he chases the setting sun,
His motto, well-lived, echos loud and clear,
If you're not happy, why are you here?

I will always remember that motto and the way you lived it, from the beginning of your life in this lifetime, to the day you left the planet, off on the greatest adventure and journey of all. You have left the planet a better and brighter place, impacted and influenced many lives for the better, and made the world much smaller and closer, with friends and family all over the world, through your work with open source software and the Internet. You have served your mission well. Thank you for giving me the privilege and joy of being your mother, and your friend. Goodbye, Son of Mine. I love you. Bye for now.

The Society for Venturism has chosen me as the recipient of its charity for this year, to hopefully offer me cryonic preservation when the time comes. And this month, Longecity, an excellent forum for the discussion of issues related to extending the lifespan of humans, has offered up a matching grant of up to a thousand dollars to help out! So help out! Please.